Essays - Michel de Montaigne

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Essays - Michel de Montaigne

Fiction - Classics - ISBN: 0140446044

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Review of "Essays - Michel de Montaigne"

published 04/12/2017 | 1st2thebar
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''The Differend: Phrases in Dispute' -- Jean - Francois Lyotard; definitely a winter warmer.
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"Of Extravagant Wisdom"

'Essays' was the reason why J J Rousseau wrote 'The Body Politic.'
Three volumes


A note on the French to English translation: you'll witness a numerical imbalance of the word thousand and thousands and many thousands - (mille: in French). I dare say, Michel de Montaigne didn't use this generalised (numerical) value / language -- in truth his precise authorship in all manners of prose is renown and why I think the translator has taken the easy route: thus being as ambiguous as possible. I suspect the term 'repertory' meaning 'various' got miscalculated.


I've just opened a bottle of 'Esprit de Puisseguin;' a sampling from the Bordeaux region; well it seemed appropriate while reading through de Montaigne's essays... in truth they're really letters (maybe 19th C reviews), conversationally done to whom it may concern; by default, formulated into chapters. The subjects possibly stimulated by 'the man in the street or Inn - discourse', the golden nugget for de Montaigne's pen, I clarify that the master pounces on ideological musings like a playful panther... reading them is a celebration of frankness and it appears he has no limitations or filter. One of the all time classics of French literature and Western prose; translated into English from French by Charles Cotton.


Marcel de Montaigne's lucid writing which was tinkered mercilessly had the hallmarks of an early blogger / online diarist - honing his intellectualism via a string of mindful updates on every subject - The Volume of Essays one to three: embodies de Montaigne's prose and petitions his theorems. Notably, his essays uses restricted language in a charming manner on par with subconscious traits, similar to most interactive comments made every second; daily. It'll be inappropriate to value his brilliance in accordance to just ink on paper, having read a fair amount of the author you'll get the impression he'd rather his wordage had longevity in digital form, forever luminating from portable devices, devoid of paper decay. Eradicating the irritation of purchasing ink and paper. Such honesty rings out from these essays, moreso than from fiction writers who systematically churn out the publications on request, I deduce de Montaigne wrote essays in a bid to reclaim personal freedom (s). Diligently embroidered in the French Renaissance, your reminded the master recognised modernity thus had his hands tied to personal convention and not forgetting experience. Perhaps the tragic death of Étienne de La Boétie in 1563 was the starting point for de Montaigne meanderings, our tender humanity often plays a vital part of who we become due to loss, La Boétie was the founder of modern political philosophy; alas was struck down with disentry in his early thirties. Such deplorable waste... why de Montaigne wrote 'Miscellanies' (1571) a slither of genius recounting the last words of Étienne, you'll find the theme encompasses 'Essays' here written in (1580); and as a keen observer of de Montaigne, I am not left in the lurch to where his motivation lies; he informs us straight, with a brachylogy most philosophers fail to adhere to.


Long extracts of dialogue remembering the exact events in detail surely creates a clearer vision of what sixteenth century France held dear. When you read aloud 'Essays' the sensitive humanity cannot be ignored, phrases sing out in harmony or punch you in the stomach: I'll expand... 'assaults of death' engages the act of death rather than just saying death itself. A fine example of deliberate expression in the simplistic term and for those with vivid imaginations, I'll consider having a break at every chapter, especially: 'To Monsieur de Montaigne;' the subsequent correspondences are at differing lengths and has an endearing quality unique for the epoch. For La Boétie scholars, I suspect the accuracy of the last words of La Boétie is what myths are made of: in essence, you grasp the indication, and attempt to master a close enough response. He indirectly announces the professional anguish of relaying non-specifics. "He handled important (specifics) in such a manner that it was difficult to reproduce exactly what he said, yet his ideas and his words at the last seemed to rival each other in serving him." The tragedy was Étienne's demise was ordinary, as too was his words, but to Étienne, the founder of modern political philosophy his words were extraordinary as if in health. The feverish courage was real but was made real due to a cloaked, self-induced oratory of 'last word' expectancy. Leaving the world a philosophical gift of grandiose magnitude, instead the scholar aided humanity a comprehension of absolute cojones -- although, a long-winded sigh is an accurate measure of what political philosophy entails - brevity endlessly finagles verbosity.


I applaud de Montaigne's descriptive pen... grace, abstraction and at times a stream of consciousness you wished you could emulate. In 'Of idleness' (Book I) - you can't help but conclude idleness is borne out of how you keep your garden. A telling point is the produce of innumerable sorts of weeds and wild herbs that are unprofitable; allowing them to run amok; perform to their true office. Those residing without land to occupy themselves could hardly be called idle in the book of de Montaigne, albeit, the idleness comes in another form: 'the idle also lets time escape without profiteering.' Slouched in a damp corner of idleness waiting for divine instruction, from a reader's perspective you gather the author has little time for idleness and I'm left bewildered about what he means by: inanimate, formless lumps of flesh, caused by a thousand extravagances... infinitely meandering (if of course formless lumps of flesh is capable of moving). Idleness is relative and dependant on the individual, even in my most idle mode I surprise myself with a seed of thought. And from that seed a big oak tree manifest, providing homes; shelter and stimulate youthful imaginations. Quite a few scholars gush over de Montaigne's chapters and automatically applaud the attentive approach; there's a sense of clandestine analogy that really shouldn't be published, 'Essays' gifts us this conundrum, a nice playful one if you don't fully engage with the alleged authoriative pen from a bygone era. I dare say, the de Montaigne delivery is unlike any professorship I've come across - my hunch is he'll make an enigmatic companion while enduring a five course dinner, or simply sampling a prodigal glass of 'Esprit de Puisseguin'. Undoubtedly, running amok on modern day amusings from the serious to the obscure ---- oh, what joviality.


'Of Liars,' stipulates the liability of one's verbal and written discourse, the author's onus underlines... validation of self-worth. Mankind has wrongly allowed centuries of rhetoric a platform, in time, generations neither will know what's an untruth or has credit. Grotesquelly, although I concur this is a human condition -- de Montaigne highlights via learning the knack of lying enables an individual an advantage, therefore honesty is questionable, de Montaigne elaborates: "tis not to be imagined how impossible it is to reclaim it whence it comes to pass that we see some... who are otherwise very honest men, so subject and enslaved to this vice." Uncertain what the reasoning behind the 'very honest men' label implies: albeit, I may deduce the author is *over-playing the etiquette card,* knowing full well that merely the educated will read his 'Essays' -- such was the dire state of literacy numbers during this epoch. You gather the foundation of credible knowledge falls short of what the truth entails. Curiously, I ponder whether de Montaigne had grasped Pythagorean maths, duly on the notion numerical value loses value when terms like infinite are used to describe unfathomable numbers. To throw in a curve-ball, the sixth century mathematicians covered themselves by adding mysticism to the mathematical mix . Indirectly, there's a suggestion divinity stroke an absolute number (existence), was devised purely to gain an audience. Modern thinkers have the capacity to conclude this was a lie. Was Michel de Montaigne also implying six century theorems aren't brimming with honesty? Sure, it's open for debate --- sadly no-one is certifiably able to judicate the prose, because as de Montaign announces via an ancient forefather: "that a dog we know is better company than a man whose language we do not understand.” Truth, habitually is hidden; it takes a guru to come up with a statement to which every intellect can't besmirch it as a deflection of the truth, and another guru to recognise its absolute worth.


'Essays' has an omnipotent quality, you'll quickly denote, the analogies embrace humanity and life cycles regardless of time.. I've lost a very close family member a few days ago, and the chapter 'Of Sorrow' worded my feelings perfectly. "He fell tearing his hair out and beating his breast... with all the other extravagances of extreme sorrow." Acceptance is neither here or there, when it's your own blood only true sorrow is felt. My view is de Montaigne wasn't just a French philosopher but a pioneer of written expression. Of course you cannot possibly allow innocent minds to read de Montaigne --- his approach isn't based on fiction / fantasy nor remotely child friendly. He had a Renaissance aura in every aspect, and we all know Renaissance means... of renewed interest.. whether it's in art, philosophy and time. It's vital that we treasure what's important in life. Write essays / letters to authoritarians and do your best for society, by not informing those who've lost sight of human values in power of the deranging injustices and depravity you're inadvertently making it acceptable. Michel de Montaigne wrote... To Monsieur Dupuy who was one of the fourteen judges sent to Guienne, about a decent man (Sieur de Veirre) on trial; claiming that the persecution of the gent's crime was far worse than the offence itself. Poverty is now deemed a crime in the UK. I've a good indication what de Montaigne would write on this subject.


Freely available online.©1st2thebar 2017

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  • 2mennycds published 06/12/2017
    superbly done!
  • bettyboo47 published 06/12/2017
    Wow!!
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    vh
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Fiction - Classics - ISBN: 0140446044

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Author: Michel de Montaigne

Title: Essays

Genre: Classics

Type: Fiction

ISBN: 0140446044

EAN: 9780140446043

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Essays - Michel de Montaigne - Review - Of Extravagant Wisdom

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About me: ''The Differend: Phrases in Dispute' -- Jean - Francois Lyotard; definitely a winter warmer.

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Of Extravagant Wisdom

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04.12.2017

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'Essays' was the reason why J J Rousseau wrote 'The Body Politic.'
Three volumes


A note on the French to English translation: you'll witness a numerical imbalance of the word thousand and thousands and many thousands - (mille: in French). I dare say, Michel de Montaigne didn't use this generalised (numerical) value / language -- in truth his precise authorship in all manners of prose is renown and why I think the translator has taken the easy route: thus being as ambiguous as possible. I suspect the term 'repertory' meaning 'various' got miscalculated.


I've just opened a bottle of 'Esprit de Puisseguin;' a sampling from the Bordeaux region; well it seemed appropriate while reading through de Montaigne's essays... in truth they're really letters (maybe 19th C reviews), conversationally done to whom it may concern; by default, formulated into chapters. The subjects possibly stimulated by 'the man in the street or Inn - discourse', the golden nugget for de Montaigne's pen, I clarify that the master pounces on ideological musings like a playful panther... reading them is a celebration of frankness and it appears he has no limitations or filter. One of the all time classics of French literature and Western prose; translated into English from French by Charles Cotton.


Marcel de Montaigne's lucid writing which was tinkered mercilessly had the hallmarks of an early blogger / online diarist - honing his intellectualism via a string of mindful updates on every subject - The Volume of Essays one to three: embodies de Montaigne's prose and petitions his theorems. Notably, his essays uses restricted language in a charming manner on par with subconscious traits, similar to most interactive comments made every second; daily. It'll be inappropriate to value his brilliance in accordance to just ink on paper, having read a fair amount of the author you'll get the impression he'd rather his wordage had longevity in digital form, forever luminating from portable devices, devoid of paper decay. Eradicating the irritation of purchasing ink and paper. Such honesty rings out from these essays, moreso than from fiction writers who systematically churn out the publications on request, I deduce de Montaigne wrote essays in a bid to reclaim personal freedom (s). Diligently embroidered in the French Renaissance, your reminded the master recognised modernity thus had his hands tied to personal convention and not forgetting experience. Perhaps the tragic death of tienne de La Botie in 1563 was the starting point for de Montaigne meanderings, our tender humanity often plays a vital part of who we become due to loss, La Botie was the founder of modern political philosophy; alas was struck down with disentry in his early thirties. Such deplorable waste... why de Montaigne wrote 'Miscellanies' (1571) a slither of genius recounting the last words of tienne, you'll find the theme encompasses 'Essays' here written in (1580); and as a keen observer of de Montaigne, I am not left in the lurch to where his motivation lies; he informs us straight, with a brachylogy most philosophers fail to adhere to.


Long extracts of dialogue remembering the exact events in detail surely creates a clearer vision of what sixteenth century France held dear. When you read aloud 'Essays' the sensitive humanity cannot be ignored, phrases sing out in harmony or punch you in the stomach: I'll expand... 'assaults of death' engages the act of death rather than just saying death itself. A fine example of deliberate expression in the simplistic term and for those with vivid imaginations, I'll consider having a break at every chapter, especially: 'To Monsieur de Montaigne;' the subsequent correspondences are at differing lengths and has an endearing quality unique for the epoch. For La Botie scholars, I suspect the accuracy of the last words of La Botie is what myths are made of: in essence, you grasp the indication, and attempt to master a close enough response. He indirectly announces the professional anguish of relaying non-specifics. "He handled important (specifics) in such a manner that it was difficult to reproduce exactly what he said, yet his ideas and his words at the last seemed to rival each other in serving him." The tragedy was tienne's demise was ordinary, as too was his words, but to tienne, the founder of modern political philosophy his words were extraordinary as if in health. The feverish courage was real but was made real due to a cloaked, self-induced oratory of 'last word' expectancy. Leaving the world a philosophical gift of grandiose magnitude, instead the scholar aided humanity a comprehension of absolute cojones -- although, a long-winded sigh is an accurate measure of what political philosophy entails - brevity endlessly finagles verbosity.


I applaud de Montaigne's descriptive pen... grace, abstraction and at times a stream of consciousness you wished you could emulate. In 'Of idleness' (Book I) - you can't help but conclude idleness is borne out of how you keep your garden. A telling point is the produce of innumerable sorts of weeds and wild herbs that are unprofitable; allowing them to run amok; perform to their true office. Those residing without land to occupy themselves could hardly be called idle in the book of de Montaigne, albeit, the idleness comes in another form: 'the idle also lets time escape without profiteering.' Slouched in a damp corner of idleness waiting for divine instruction, from a reader's perspective you gather the author has little time for idleness and I'm left bewildered about what he means by: inanimate, formless lumps of flesh, caused by a thousand extravagances... infinitely meandering (if of course formless lumps of flesh is capable of moving). Idleness is relative and dependant on the individual, even in my most idle mode I surprise myself with a seed of thought. And from that seed a big oak tree manifest, providing homes; shelter and stimulate youthful imaginations. Quite a few scholars gush over de Montaigne's chapters and automatically applaud the attentive approach; there's a sense of clandestine analogy that really shouldn't be published, 'Essays' gifts us this conundrum, a nice playful one if you don't fully engage with the alleged authoriative pen from a bygone era. I dare say, the de Montaigne delivery is unlike any professorship I've come across - my hunch is he'll make an enigmatic companion while enduring a five course dinner, or simply sampling a prodigal glass of 'Esprit de Puisseguin'. Undoubtedly, running amok on modern day amusings from the serious to the obscure ---- oh, what joviality.


'Of Liars,' stipulates the liability of one's verbal and written discourse, the author's onus underlines... validation of self-worth. Mankind has wrongly allowed centuries of rhetoric a platform, in time, generations neither will know what's an untruth or has credit. Grotesquelly, although I concur this is a human condition -- de Montaigne highlights via learning the knack of lying enables an individual an advantage, therefore honesty is questionable, de Montaigne elaborates: "tis not to be imagined how impossible it is to reclaim it whence it comes to pass that we see some... who are otherwise very honest men, so subject and enslaved to this vice." Uncertain what the reasoning behind the 'very honest men' label implies: albeit, I may deduce the author is *over-playing the etiquette card,* knowing full well that merely the educated will read his 'Essays' -- such was the dire state of literacy numbers during this epoch. You gather the foundation of credible knowledge falls short of what the truth entails. Curiously, I ponder whether de Montaigne had grasped Pythagorean maths, duly on the notion numerical value loses value when terms like infinite are used to describe unfathomable numbers. To throw in a curve-ball, the sixth century mathematicians covered themselves by adding mysticism to the mathematical mix . Indirectly, there's a suggestion divinity stroke an absolute number (existence), was devised purely to gain an audience. Modern thinkers have the capacity to conclude this was a lie. Was Michel de Montaigne also implying six century theorems aren't brimming with honesty? Sure, it's open for debate --- sadly no-one is certifiably able to judicate the prose, because as de Montaign announces via an ancient forefather: "that a dog we know is better company than a man whose language we do not understand. Truth, habitually is hidden; it takes a guru to come up with a statement to which every intellect can't besmirch it as a deflection of the truth, and another guru to recognise its absolute worth.


'Essays' has an omnipotent quality, you'll quickly denote, the analogies embrace humanity and life cycles regardless of time.. I've lost a very close family member a few days ago, and the chapter 'Of Sorrow' worded my feelings perfectly. "He fell tearing his hair out and beating his breast... with all the other extravagances of extreme sorrow." Acceptance is neither here or there, when it's your own blood only true sorrow is felt. My view is de Montaigne wasn't just a French philosopher but a pioneer of written expression. Of course you cannot possibly allow innocent minds to read de Montaigne --- his approach isn't based on fiction / fantasy nor remotely child friendly. He had a Renaissance aura in every aspect, and we all know Renaissance means... of renewed interest.. whether it's in art, philosophy and time. It's vital that we treasure what's important in life. Write essays / letters to authoritarians and do your best for society, by not informing those who've lost sight of human values in power of the deranging injustices and depravity you're inadvertently making it acceptable. Michel de Montaigne wrote... To Monsieur Dupuy who was one of the fourteen judges sent to Guienne, about a decent man (Sieur de Veirre) on trial; claiming that the persecution of the gent's crime was far worse than the offence itself. Poverty is now deemed a crime in the UK. I've a good indication what de Montaigne would write on this subject.


Freely available online.1st2thebar 2017

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2mennycds 06.12.2017 16:55

superbly done!

bettyboo47 06.12.2017 09:40

Wow!!

ravingreviewer 05.12.2017 19:09

vh

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Author Michel de Montaigne
Title Essays
Genre Classics
Type Fiction
ISBN 0140446044
EAN 9780140446043

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Essays - Michel de Montaigne - review by lewiscrofts

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This review of Essays - Michel de Montaigne has been rated:

"exceptional" by (89%):

  1. 2mennycds
  2. bettyboo47
  3. mumsymary

and 5 other members

"very helpful" by (11%):

  1. ravingreviewer

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